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Summary: Frontier Blood written by Jo Ella Powell Exley complete 352 pages, and read, download pdf latest History ebooks related to Frontier Blood ebook.

Frontier Blood

Written By: Jo Ella Powell Exley
  • ID Book : 9781603441094
  • Publisher : Texas A&M University Press
  • Number of Pages : 352
  • Genre : History
  • Reads : 218
  • Supported Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • eFile : frontier-blood.pdf

Inside Book:

A must read for anyone with an interest in the far Southwest or Native American history.

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Single Star of the West

By Kenneth W. Howell,Charles Swanlund
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Isbn : 1574416715
  • Pages : 560
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 381
  • File Pdf: single-star-of-the-west.pdf

Book Summary:

Does Texas’s experience as a republic make it unique among the other states? In many ways, Texas was an “accidental republic” for nearly ten years, until Texans voted overwhelmingly in favor of annexation to the United States after winning independence from Mexico. Single Star of the West chronicles Texas’s efforts to maneuver through the pitfalls and hardships of creating and maintaining the “accidental republic.” The volume begins with the Texas Revolution and examines whether or not a true Texas identity emerged during the Republic era. Next, several contributors discuss how the Republic was defended by its army, navy, and the Texas Rangers. Individual chapters focus on the early founders of Texas—Sam Houston, Mirabeau B. Lamar, and Anson Jones—who were all exceptional men, but like all men, suffered from their own share of fears and faults. Texas’s efforts at diplomacy, and persistence and transformation in its economy, also receive careful analysis. Finally, social and cultural aspects of the Texas Republic receive coverage, with discussions of women, American Indians, African Americans, Tejanos, and religion. The contributors also focus on the extent that conditions in the republic attracted political and economic opportunists, some of whom achieved a remarkable degree of success. Single Star of the West also highlights how the Texas Republic was established on American political ideology. With the majority of the white settlers coming from the United States, this will not surprise many scholars of the era. In some cases, the Texans successfully adopted American political and economic ideology to their needs, while other times they failed miserably.

Most Secret Agent of Empire

By Taline ter Minassian
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Isbn : 0190257490
  • Pages : 256
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 982
  • File Pdf: most-secret-agent-of-empire.pdf

Book Summary:

Dubbed an "agent of British imperialism" by Joseph Stalin, Reginald Teague-Jones (1889- 1988) was the quintessential English spy whose exceptional story is recounted in this new biography. He studied in St Petersburg, participated in the 1905 Revolution and spent the rest of his life working for various branches of British secret intelligence. Plunging into the Great Game, he participated in daring operations against the Bolsheviks and tracked down a turbulent German agent, Wilhelm Wassmuss, who was spreading anti-British propaganda in Persia. Teague-Jones was also held responsible for the execution of 'the 26 Commissars' after the fall of the Baku Commune in 1918. This became one of the Soviet Union's most powerful cults of martyrology, inspiring a poem by Yesenin, a Brodsky painting, a 1933 feature film and an immense monument. Shortly after, Teague-Jones changed his name to Ronald Sinclair and adopted a secret persona for the next five decades, for part of which he worked undercover in the United States as an expert on Indian, Soviet and Middle-Eastern affairs, possibly in collaboration with the OSS, the new American secret service. In his swan song in espionage he kept a gimlet eye on the Soviet delegation to the UN in New York. For these reasons, and many others besides, Reginald Teague-Jones is the most important British spy you have never heard of.

Religion and the Conceptual Boundary in Central and Eastern Europe

By T. Bremer
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Isbn : 0230590020
  • Pages : 242
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 923
  • File Pdf: religion-and-the-conceptual-boundary-in-central-and-eastern-europe.pdf

Book Summary:

This volume concentrates on the 'conceptual boundary' through Europe which is determined by Western and Eastern Christianity. The chapters show that the boundary has never been a stable and defined division, but that it was also subject to change and development and a place of encounter and exchange between religions and cultures.

Ernest Haycox and the Western

By Richard W. Etulain
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Isbn : 0806159219
  • Pages : 200
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Reads : 603
  • File Pdf: ernest-haycox-and-the-western.pdf

Book Summary:

Western fans today may not recognize the name Ernest Haycox (1899–1950), but they know his work. John Ford turned one of his stories into the iconic film Stagecoach, and the whole Western literary genre still follows conventions that Haycox deftly mastered and reshaped. In this new book about Haycox’s literary career, Richard W. Etulain tells the engrossing story of his rise through the ranks of popular magazine and serial fiction to become one of the Western’s most successful creators. After graduating from the University of Oregon in 1923 with a degree in journalism, Haycox began his quest to break into New York’s pulp magazine scene, submitting dozens of stories before he began to make a living from his writing. By the end of the 1920s he had become a top writer for Western Story, Short Stories, and Adventure, among other popular weeklies and monthlies. Ernest Haycox and the Western traces Haycox’s path from rank beginner, to crack pulp writer, to regular contributor to Collier’s and the Saturday Evening Post. Etulain shows how Haycox experimented with techniques to deepen and broaden his Westerns, creating more introspective protagonists (Hamlet heroes), introducing new types of heroines (the brunette vixen, the blonde Puritan), and weaving greater historical realism into his plots. After reaching the height of success with his best-selling Custer novel, Bugles in the Afternoon (1944), Haycox moved away from the financially rewarding but artistically constricting Western formula—only to achieve his final coup with The Earthbreakers, a historical novel about the end of the Oregon Trail, published posthumously in 1952. Reconstructing the career of a popular literary giant, Ernest Haycox and the Western restores Haycox to his rightful place in the history of Western literature.

Women in the Western

By Matheson Sue Matheson
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Edinburgh University Press
  • Isbn : 1474444164
  • Pages : 360
  • Category : Performing Arts
  • Reads : 629
  • File Pdf: women-in-the-western.pdf

Book Summary:

In Westerns, women transmit complicated cultural coding about the nature of westward expansionism, heroism, family life, manliness and American femininity. As the genre changes and matures, depictions of women have transitioned from traditional to more modern roles. Frontier Feminine charts these significant shifts in the Western's transmission of gender values and expectations and aims to expand the critical arena in which Western film is situated by acknowledging the importance of women in this genre.

The Texas Rangers

By Mike Cox
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Forge Books
  • Isbn : 9781429941426
  • Pages : 496
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 791
  • File Pdf: the-texas-rangers.pdf

Book Summary:

Texas writer/historian Mike Cox explores the inception and rise of the famed Texas Rangers. Starting in 1821 with just a handful of men, the Rangers' first purpose was to keep settlers safe from the feared and gruesome Karankawa Indians, a cannibalistic tribe that wandered the Texas territory. As the influx of settlers grew, the attacks increased and it became clear that a much larger, better trained force was necessary. From their tumultuous beginning to their decades of fighting outlaws, Comanche, Mexican soldados and banditos, as well as Union soldiers, the Texas Rangers became one of the fiercest law enforcement groups in America. In a land as spread-out and sparsely populated as the west itself, the Rangers had unique law-enforcement responsibilities and challenges. The story of the Texas Rangers is as controversial as it is heroic. Often accused of vigilante-style racism and murder, they enforced the law with a heavy hand. But above all they were perhaps the defining force for the stabilization and the creation of Texas. From Stephen Austin in the early days through the Civil War, the first eighty years of the Texas Rangers is nothing less then phenomenal, and the efforts put forth in those days set the foundation for the Texas Rangers that keep Texas safe today. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Romantic Revolution in America, 1800-1860

By Vernon Louis Parrington
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Transaction Publishers
  • Isbn : 1412846277
  • Pages :
  • Category :
  • Reads : 406
  • File Pdf: the-romantic-revolution-in-america-1800-1860.pdf

Book Summary:

Read and download full book The Romantic Revolution in America, 1800-1860

Brother-Making in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

By Claudia Rapp
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Isbn : 0199908389
  • Pages : 368
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 217
  • File Pdf: brother-making-in-late-antiquity-and-byzantium.pdf

Book Summary:

Among medieval Christian societies, Byzantium is unique in preserving an ecclesiastical ritual of adelphopoiesis, which pronounces two men, not related by birth, as brothers for life. It has its origin as a spiritual blessing in the monastic world of late antiquity, and it becomes a popular social networking strategy among lay people from the ninth century onwards, even finding application in recent times. Located at the intersection of religion and society, brother-making exemplifies how social practice can become ritualized and subsequently subjected to attempts of ecclesiastical and legal control. Controversially, adelphopoiesis was at the center of a modern debate about the existence of same-sex unions in medieval Europe. This book, the first ever comprehensive history of this unique feature of Byzantine life, argues persuasively that the ecclesiastical ritual to bless a relationship between two men bears no resemblance to marriage. Wide-ranging in its use of sources, from a complete census of the manuscripts containing the ritual of adelphopoiesis to the literature and archaeology of early monasticism, and from the works of hagiographers, historiographers, and legal experts in Byzantium to comparative material in the Latin West and the Slavic world, Brother-Making in Late Antiquity and Byzantium examines the fascinating religious and social features of the ritual, shedding light on little known aspects of Byzantine society.

Tracking the Texas Rangers

By Bruce A. Glasrud,Harold J. Weiss
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Isbn : 1574414658
  • Pages : 358
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 708
  • File Pdf: tracking-the-texas-rangers.pdf

Book Summary:

An anthology of sixteen previously published articles and chapter excerpts, arranged in chronological history, covering key topics of the intrepid and sometimes controversial law officers named the Texas Rangers. Determining the role of the Rangers as the state evolved and what they actually accomplished for the benefit of the state is a difficult challenge?the actions of the Rangers fit no easy description. There is a dark side to the story of the Rangers; during the war with Mexico, for example, some murdered, pillaged, and raped. Yet these same Rangers eased the resultant United States victory. Even their beginning and the first use of the term ?Texas Ranger? have mixed and complex origins. Tracking the Texas Rangers covers topics such as their early years, the great Comanche Raid of 1840, and the effective use of Colt revolvers. Article authors discuss Los Diablos Tejanos, Rip Ford, the Cortina War, the use of Hispanic Rangers and Rangers in labor disputes, and the recapture of Cynthia Ann Parker and the capture of John Wesley Hardin. The selections cover critical aspects of those experiences?organization, leadership, cultural implications, rural and urban life, and violence. In their introduction, editors Bruce A. Glasrud and Harold J. Weiss, Jr., discuss various themes and controversies surrounding the 19th-century Rangers and their treatment by historians over the years. They also have added annotations to the essays to explain where new research has shed additional light on an event to update or correct the original article text.--Amazon.com.

The Inevitability of Tragedy: Henry Kissinger and His World

By Barry Gewen
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Isbn : 1324004061
  • Pages : 496
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Reads : 726
  • File Pdf: the-inevitability-of-tragedy.pdf

Book Summary:

A new portrait of Henry Kissinger focusing on the fundamental ideas underlying his policies: Realism, balance of power, and national interest. Few public officials have provoked such intense controversy as Henry Kissinger. During his time in the Nixon and Ford administrations, he came to be admired and hated in equal measure. Notoriously, he believed that foreign affairs ought to be based primarily on the power relationships of a situation, not simply on ethics. He went so far as to argue that under certain circumstances America had to protect its national interests even if that meant repressing other countries’ attempts at democracy. For this reason, many today on both the right and left dismiss him as a latter-day Machiavelli, ignoring the breadth and complexity of his thought. With The Inevitability of Tragedy, Barry Gewen corrects this shallow view, presenting the fascinating story of Kissinger’s development as both a strategist and an intellectual and examining his unique role in government through his ideas. It analyzes his contentious policies in Vietnam and Chile, guided by a fresh understanding of his definition of Realism, the belief that world politics is based on an inevitable, tragic competition for power. Crucially, Gewen places Kissinger’s pessimistic thought in a European context. He considers how Kissinger was deeply impacted by his experience as a refugee from Nazi Germany, and explores the links between his notions of power and those of his mentor, Hans Morgenthau—the father of Realism—as well as those of two other German-Jewish émigrés who shared his concerns about the weaknesses of democracy: Leo Strauss and Hannah Arendt. The Inevitability of Tragedy offers a thoughtful perspective on the origins of Kissinger’s sober worldview and argues that a reconsideration of his career is essential at a time when American foreign policy lacks direction.

Texas

By Rupert N. Richardson,Cary D. Wintz,Angela Boswell,Adrian Anderson,Ernest Wallace
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1000403769
  • Pages : 494
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 823
  • File Pdf: texas.pdf

Book Summary:

Now in its 11th edition, Texas: The Lone Star State offers a balanced, scholarly overview of the second largest state in the United States, spanning from prehistory to the twenty-first century. Organized chronologically, this comprehensive survey introduces undergraduates to the varied history of Texas with an accessible narrative and over 100 illustrations and maps. This new edition broadens the discussion of postwar social and political dynamics within the state, including the development of key industries and changing demographics. Other new features include: New maps reflecting county by county results for the most recent presidential elections Expanded discussions on immigration and border security The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in Texas and a look to the future Updated bibliographies to reflect the most recent scholarship This textbook is essential reading for students of American history.

Proteomics: Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Applications

By Hubert Hondermarck
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Isbn : 1402023235
  • Pages : 396
  • Category : Medical
  • Reads : 773
  • File Pdf: proteomics.pdf

Book Summary:

Human biology has now entered into a phase of post-genomics and it might not be an exaggeration to say that the major outcome of the human genome sequencing has finally been to open the way to the exploration of the proteome-proteomics. Proteins are the functional output of genes and there are two main expected outcomes from human proteomics. The first is to discover new molecular markers for early diagnosis and profiling of pathologies. The second is to decipher the intracellular signaling pathways leading to the initiation and progression of pathologies, for the identification of new targets and the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. This is clearly a promising challenge that this book explores through a series of ongoing experiences and projects representative of the new era in which biology and medicine have now entered.

Blood Meridian

By Cormac McCarthy
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Isbn : 0307762521
  • Pages : 368
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 691
  • File Pdf: blood-meridian.pdf

Book Summary:

25th ANNIVERSARY EDITION • An epic novel of the violence and depravity that attended America's westward expansion, Blood Meridian brilliantly subverts the conventions of the Western novel and the mythology of the Wild West—from the bestselling, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Road Based on historical events that took place on the Texas-Mexico border in the 1850s, it traces the fortunes of the Kid, a fourteen-year-old Tennesseean who stumbles into the nightmarish world where Indians are being murdered and the market for their scalps is thriving.

Mixed Blood Indians

By Theda Perdue
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Georgia Press
  • Isbn : 0820327166
  • Pages : 160
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 629
  • File Pdf: mixed-blood-indians.pdf

Book Summary:

On the southern frontier in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, European men--including traders, soldiers, and government agents--sometimes married Native women. Children of these unions were known by whites as "half-breeds." The Indian societies into which they were born, however, had no corresponding concepts of race or "blood." Moreover, counter to European customs and laws, Native lineage was traced through the mother only. No familial status or rights stemmed from the father. "Mixed Blood" Indians looks at a fascinating array of such birth- and kin-related issues as they were alternately misunderstood and astutely exploited by both Native and European cultures. Theda Perdue discusses the assimilation of non-Indians into Native societies, their descendants' participation in tribal life, and the white cultural assumptions conveyed in the designation "mixed blood." In addition to unions between European men and Native women, Perdue also considers the special cases arising from the presence of white women and African men and women in Indian society. From the colonial through the early national era, "mixed bloods" were often in the middle of struggles between white expansionism and Native cultural survival. That these "half-breeds" often resisted appeals to their "civilized" blood helped foster an enduring image of Natives as fickle allies of white politicians, missionaries, and entrepreneurs. "Mixed Blood" Indians rereads a number of early writings to show us the Native outlook on these misperceptions and to make clear that race is too simple a measure of their--or any peoples'--motives.

The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Intensive Review of Internal Medicine

By James K. Stoller
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  • Isbn : 1469881276
  • Pages : 432
  • Category : Medical
  • Reads : 536
  • File Pdf: the-cleveland-clinic-foundation-intensive-review-of-internal-medicine.pdf

Book Summary:

Succeed on internal medicine board certification and recertification exams with Cleveland Clinic Intensive Board Review of Internal Medicine, 6e! The new edition contains ancillary and online exclusive content, drawing from the expertise of the distinguished Cleveland Clinic faculty. Taking a more clinical approach than other review texts, this practical resource includes a unique and well-structured set of exercises that offer a challenge at the end of each chapter.

The Ranger Ideal Volume 1

By Darren L. Ivey
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Isbn : 1574417010
  • Pages : 672
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 735
  • File Pdf: the-ranger-ideal-volume-1.pdf

Book Summary:

Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service which has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. Thirty-one Rangers, with lives spanning more than two centuries, have been enshrined in the Hall of Fame. In The Ranger Ideal Volume 1: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1823-1861, Darren L. Ivey presents capsule biographies of the seven inductees who served Texas before the Civil War. He begins with Stephen F. Austin, “the Father of Texas,” who laid the foundations of the Ranger service, and then covers John C. Hays, Ben McCulloch, Samuel H. Walker, William A. A. “Bigfoot” Wallace, John S. Ford, and Lawrence Sul Ross. Using primary records and reliable secondary sources, and rejecting apocryphal tales, The Ranger Ideal presents the true stories of these intrepid men who fought to tame a land with gallantry, grit, and guns. This Volume 1 is the first of a planned three-volume series covering all of the Texas Rangers inducted in the Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas.

The Romantic Revolution in America: 1800-1860

By Michael Young
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1351474812
  • Pages : 531
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Reads : 420
  • File Pdf: the-romantic-revolution-in-america.pdf

Book Summary:

The development of literature between 1800 and 1860 in the United States was heavily influenced by two wars. The War of 1812 hastened the development of nineteenth-century ideals, and the Civil War uprooted certain growths of those vigorous years. The half century between these dramatic episodes was a period of extravagant vigor, the final outcome being the emergence of a new middle class. Parrington argues that America was becoming a new world with undreamed potential. This new era was no longer content with the ways of a founding generation. The older America of colonial days had been static, rationalistic, inclined to pessimism, and fearful of innovation. During the years between the Peace of Paris (1763) and the end of the War of 1812, older America was dying. The America that emerged, which is the focal point of this volume, was a shifting, restless world, eager to better itself, bent on finding easier roads to wealth than the plodding path of natural increase. The culture of this period also changed. Formal biographies written in this period often gave way to eulogy; it was believed that a writer was under obligation to speak well of the dead. Consequently, scarcely a single commentary of the times can be trusted, and the critic is reduced to patching together his account out of scanty odds and ends. A new introduction by Bruce Brown highlights the life of Vernon Louis Parrington and explains the importance of this second volume in the Pulitzer Prize-winning study.

Hard Travellin'

By Kenneth Allsop
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : A&C Black
  • Isbn : 1448206014
  • Pages : 444
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 283
  • File Pdf: hard-travellin.pdf

Book Summary:

It was the railway system which moulded the American hobo into the legendary figure he became, especially in the depression years, but surviving until today. His origins, however, go back to the early pioneer days. He is in fact a unique and indigenous American product, 'capriciously used and discarded by a callous but dynamic system'. Revered and romanticized by some as the prototype of free man, he is hated and feared by others for his nonconformity. In order to trace the origins of the various types of hobo and their effect on American life, Kenneth Allsop travelled 9,000 miles across the continent, following old hobo routes, interviewing and researching as he went along.

Hypermasculinities in the Contemporary Novel

By Josef Benson
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Isbn : 1442237619
  • Pages : 158
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Reads : 614
  • File Pdf: hypermasculinities-in-the-contemporary-novel.pdf

Book Summary:

This book examines exaggerated masculinities in select novels by James Baldwin, Cormac McCarthy, and Toni Morrison. Through this analysis Josef Benson connects the masculinities of frontier figures with black male protagonists in postwar American novels, and how these novels present alternative ideal masculinities.

The Testimonies of Indian Soldiers and the Two World Wars

By Gajendra Singh
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : A&C Black
  • Isbn : 1780937601
  • Pages : 224
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 795
  • File Pdf: the-testimonies-of-indian-soldiers-and-the-two-world-wars.pdf

Book Summary:

In the two World Wars, hundreds of thousands of Indian sepoys were mobilized, recruited and shipped overseas to fight for the British Crown. The Indian Army was the chief Imperial reserve for an empire under threat. But how did those sepoys understand and explain their own war experiences and indeed themselves through that experience? How much did their testimonies realise and reflect their own fragmented identities as both colonial subjects and imperial policemen? The Testimonies of Indian Soldiers and the Two World Wars draws upon the accounts of Indian combatants to explore how they came to terms with the conflicts. In thematic chapters, Gajendra Singh traces the evolution of military identities under the British Raj and considers how those identities became embattled in the praxis of soldiers' war testimonies – chiefly letters, depositions and interrogations. It becomes a story of mutiny and obedience; of horror, loss and silence. This book tells that story and is an important contribution to histories of the British Empire, South Asia and the two World Wars.

Winston Churchill Reporting

By Simon Read
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Da Capo Press
  • Isbn : 0306823829
  • Pages : 328
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Reads : 540
  • File Pdf: winston-churchill-reporting.pdf

Book Summary:

Long before his finest hour as Britain's wartime leader, Winston Churchill emerged on the world stage as a brazen foreign correspondent, covering wars of empire in Cuba, India, the Sudan, and South Africa. In those far-flung corners of the world, reporting from the front lines between 1895 and 1900, Churchill mastered his celebrated command of language and formed strong opinions about war. He thought little of his own personal safety, so convinced was he of his destiny, jumping at any chance to be where bullets flew and canons roared. "I have faith in my star that I am intended to do something in the world," he wrote to his mother at the age of twenty-three before heading into battle. Based on his private letters and war reportage, Winston Churchill Reporting intertwines young Winston's daring exploits in combat, adventures in distant corners of the globe, and rise as a major literary talent experiences that shaped the world leader he was to become.

Ti & Do the Father & “Jesus” Heaven’S Gate Ufo Two Witnesses

By Sawyer
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : AuthorHouse
  • Isbn : 1524657611
  • Pages : 912
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 911
  • File Pdf: ti-do-the-father-jesus-heaven-s-gate-ufo-two-witnesses.pdf

Book Summary:

This book provides detailed evidence from everything Jesus prophesied, often broken down to the root definitions of terms from the Greek and Aramaic/Hebrew languages which manuscripts were written in, to show in context by numerous Bible records, how and why those called, Ti (Tee) and Do (Doe) were the new incarnations of the One referred to as the Father and before then, Jehovah and Elohim, with the One who was incarnate in the vehicle (body) named Jesus, and before then Elijah, Moses, Enoch and Adam, who with Their Crew of Student "Saints," were on earth again to fulfill the promised return of Their Kingdom during these "End Times," through Their task recorded as the "Two Witnesses" in the Book of Revelations, that was completed when they exited their incarnations in March of 1997 - seen in the world's news as Heaven's Gate. Ti and Do left extensive records of everything they came to awaken to know over their combined 25 years incarnate. As I spent 19 fully dedicated years with them I drew upon their records and my experience to describe many new translations of terms and new interpretations of most all Book of Revelations records. Finally, I studied world history and current events that can be shown to be valid reference points in many prophecies. This includes many unusual events NASA has photographed in outer space as Jesus prophesied; a cityscape of Lights on dwarf planet Ceres, earth-like qualities to dwarf planet Pluto, hexagon shaped top on Saturn, spire like towers on the Moon, complicated objects that resemble Star Trek's star-ship enterprise in the sun's corona, comets that are comprised of several to seven objects flying in V formation, or having companion objects with them and parts of UFO and Luciferian space alien reports, holograms like Fatima and Spirits. TI & DO The Father and "Jesus" Heaven's Gate UFO Two Witnesses, Who Returned Incarnate With Their "Saints," From 1972 to 1997 Prophesied in the Book of Revelations Termed by Christians as "The Second Coming" From The Physical "Evolutionary" Level Above Human The Kingdom of God in Heaven Whose Membership: "Wear" Physical Vehicles (Bodies), Grown on a Vine (That Human bodies are Designed to Resemble) To Work Within planet Sized Spacecrafts Like Pluto and Ceres That Serve as Laboratories for Their Earth Soul-Growing "Garden" Experiments That Incorporate the Negative Influence of The Luciferian "Space" Aliens, aka "The Fallen Angels" So Prospective New Members, Directed By Incarnate Older members May Overcome the Human "Evolutionary" Kingdom To Graduate Into the Next Level Kingdom In the Literal Heavens.

Americans Recaptured

By Molly K. Varley
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Isbn : 0806147547
  • Pages : 240
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 539
  • File Pdf: americans-recaptured.pdf

Book Summary:

It was on the frontier, where “civilized” men and women confronted the “wilderness,” that Europeans first became Americans—or so authorities from Frederick Jackson Turner to Theodore Roosevelt claimed. But as the frontier disappeared, Americans believed they needed a new mechanism for fixing their collective identity; and they found it, historian Molly K. Varley suggests, in tales of white Americans held captive by Indians. For Americans in the Progressive Era (1890–1916) these stories of Indian captivity seemed to prove that the violence of national expansion had been justified, that citizens’ individual suffering had been heroic, and that settlers’ contact with Indians and wilderness still characterized the nation’s “soul.” Furthermore, in the act of memorializing white Indian captives—through statues, parks, and reissued narratives—small towns found a way of inscribing themselves into the national story. By drawing out the connections between actual captivity, captivity narratives, and the memorializing of white captives, Varley shows how Indian captivity became a means for Progressive Era Americans to look forward by looking back. Local boosters and cultural commentators used Indian captivity to define “Americanism” and to renew those frontier qualities deemed vital to the survival of the nation in the post-frontier world, such as individualism, bravery, ingenuity, enthusiasm, “manliness,” and patriotism. In Varley’s analysis of the Progressive Era mentality, contact between white captives and Indians represented a stage in the evolution of a new American people and affirmed the contemporary notion of America as a melting pot. Revealing how the recitation and interpretation of these captivity narratives changed over time—with shifting emphasis on brutality, gender, and ethnographic and historical accuracy—Americans Recaptured shows that tales of Indian captivity were no more fixed than American identity, but were consistently used to give that identity its own useful, ever-evolving shape.

Red Treachery Black Slavery

By James Kaye
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Xlibris Corporation
  • Isbn : 1984587064
  • Pages : 132
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 237
  • File Pdf: red-treachery-black-slavery.pdf

Book Summary:

Red Treachery Black Slavery is a history of the confrontations in Texas between Native Americans and Anglo-American settlers, and of plantation slave life of which both subjects were dark histories of the Texas frontier between the 1820's and 1870's.

The Settlement of America

By James A. Crutchfield,Candy Moutlon,Terry Del Bene
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 131745460X
  • Pages : 800
  • Category : Business & Economics
  • Reads : 439
  • File Pdf: the-settlement-of-america.pdf

Book Summary:

First Published in 2015. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Texas Rangers

By Bob Alexander,Donaly E. Brice
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Isbn : 157441691X
  • Pages : 672
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 694
  • File Pdf: texas-rangers.pdf

Book Summary:

Authors Bob Alexander and Donaly E. Brice grappled with several issues when deciding how to relate a general history of the Texas Rangers. Should emphasis be placed on their frontier defense against Indians, or focus more on their role as guardians of the peace and statewide law enforcers? What about the tumultuous Mexican Revolution period, 1910-1920? And how to deal with myths and legends such as One Riot, One Ranger? Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy is the authors’ answer to these questions, a one-volume history of the Texas Rangers. The authors begin with the earliest Rangers in the pre-Republic years in 1823 and take the story up through the Republic, Mexican War, and Civil War. Then, with the advent of the Frontier Battalion, the authors focus in detail on each company A through F, relating what was happening within each company concurrently. Thereafter, Alexander and Brice tell the famous episodes of the Rangers that forged their legend, and bring the story up through the twentieth century to the present day in the final chapters.

The Captured

By Scott Zesch
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : St. Martin's Press
  • Isbn : 1429910119
  • Pages : 384
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 804
  • File Pdf: the-captured.pdf

Book Summary:

On New Year's Day in 1870, ten-year-old Adolph Korn was kidnapped by an Apache raiding party. Traded to Comaches, he thrived in the rough, nomadic existence, quickly becoming one of the tribe's fiercest warriors. Forcibly returned to his parents after three years, Korn never adjusted to life in white society. He spent his last years in a cave, all but forgotten by his family. That is, until Scott Zesch stumbled over his own great-great-great uncle's grave. Determined to understand how such a "good boy" could have become Indianized so completely, Zesch travels across the west, digging through archives, speaking with Comanche elders, and tracking eight other child captives from the region with hauntingly similar experiences. With a historians rigor and a novelists eye, Zesch's The Captured paints a vivid portrait of life on the Texas frontier, offering a rare account of captivity. "A carefully written, well-researched contribution to Western history -- and to a promising new genre: the anthropology of the stolen." - Kirkus Reviews

Empire of the Summer Moon

By S. C. Gwynne
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Isbn : 1416597158
  • Pages : 384
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 943
  • File Pdf: empire-of-the-summer-moon.pdf

Book Summary:

*Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award* *A New York Times Notable Book* *Winner of the Texas Book Award and the Oklahoma Book Award* This New York Times bestseller and stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West “is nothing short of a revelation…will leave dust and blood on your jeans” (The New York Times Book Review). Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads, and the amazing story of Cynthia Ann Parker and her son Quanah—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Hailed by critics, S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.

Fort Worth Characters

By Richard F. Selcer
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Isbn : 1574412744
  • Pages : 288
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Reads : 519
  • File Pdf: fort-worth-characters.pdf

Book Summary:

Fort Worth history is far more than the handful of familiar names that every true-blue Fort Worther hears growing up: leaders such as Amon Carter, B. B. Paddock, J. Frank Norris, and William McDonald. Their names are indexed in the history books for ready reference. But the drama that is Fort Worth history contains other, less famous characters who played important roles, like Judge James Swayne, Madam Mary Porter, and Marshal Sam Farmer: well known enough in their day but since forgotten. Others, like Al Hayne, lived their lives in the shadows until one, spectacular moment of heroism. Then there are the lawmen, Jim Courtright, Jeff Daggett, and Thomas Finch. They wore badges, but did not always represent the best of law and order. These seven plus five others are gathered together between the covers of this book. Each has a story that deserves to be told. If they did not all make history, they certainly lived in historic times. The jury is still out on whether they shaped their times or merely reflected those times. Either way, their stories add new perspectives to the familiar Fort Worth story, revealing how the law worked in the old days and what life was like for persons of color and for women living in a man's world. As the old TV show used to say, “There are a million stories in the 'Naked City.'” There may not be quite as many stories in Cowtown, but there are plenty waiting to be told—enough for future volumes of Fort Worth Characters. But this is a good starting point.

Bad Company and Burnt Powder

By Bob Alexander
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Isbn : 1574415662
  • Pages : 480
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 112
  • File Pdf: bad-company-and-burnt-powder.pdf

Book Summary:

Bad Company and Burnt Powder is a collection of twelve stories of when things turned "Western" in the nineteenth-century Southwest. Each chapter deals with a different character or episode in the Wild West involving various lawmen, Texas Rangers, outlaws, feudists, vigilantes, lawyers, and judges. Covered herein are the stories of Cal Aten, John Hittson, the Millican boys, Gid Taylor and Jim and Tom Murphy, Alf Rushing, Bob Meldrum and Noah Wilkerson, P. C. Baird, Gus Chenowth, Jim Dunaway, John Kinney, Elbert Hanks and Boyd White, and Eddie Aten. Within these pages the reader will meet a nineteen-year-old Texas Ranger figuratively dying to shoot his gun. He does get to shoot at people, but soon realizes what he thought was a bargain exacted a steep price. Another tale is of an old-school cowman who shut down illicit traffic in stolen livestock that had existed for years on the Llano Estacado. He was tough, salty, and had no quarter for cow-thieves or sympathy for any mealy-mouthed politicians. He cleaned house, maybe not too nicely, but unarguably successful he was. Then there is the tale of an accomplished and unbeaten fugitive, well known and identified for murder of a Texas peace officer. But the Texas Rangers couldn't find him. County sheriffs wouldn't hold him. Slipping away from bounty hunters, he hit Owlhoot Trail.

Empires, Nations, and Families

By Anne F. Hyde
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
  • Isbn : 0803245831
  • Pages : 648
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 311
  • File Pdf: empires-nations-and-families.pdf

Book Summary:

Read and download full book Empires, Nations, and Families

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