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Summary: Unexampled Courage written by Richard Gergel complete 336 pages, and read, download pdf latest History ebooks related to Unexampled Courage ebook.

Unexampled Courage

Written By: Richard Gergel
  • ID Book : 0374718512
  • Publisher : Sarah Crichton Books
  • Number of Pages : 336
  • Genre : History
  • Reads : 583
  • Supported Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • eFile : unexampled-courage.pdf

Inside Book:

A 2019 NPR Staff Pick How the blinding of Sergeant Isaac Woodard changed the course of America’s civil rights history On February 12, 1946, Sergeant Isaac Woodard, a returning, decorated African American veteran, was removed from a Greyhound bus in Batesburg, South Carolina, after he challenged the bus driver’s disrespectful treatment of him. Woodard, in uniform, was arrested by the local police chief, Lynwood Shull, and beaten and blinded while in custody. President Harry Truman was outraged by the incident. He established the first presidential commission on civil rights and his Justice Department filed criminal charges against Shull. In July 1948, following his commission’s recommendation, Truman ordered an end to segregation in the U.S. armed forces. An all-white South Carolina jury acquitted Shull, but the presiding judge, J. Waties Waring, was conscience-stricken by the failure of the court system to do justice by the soldier. Waring described the trial as his “baptism of fire,” and began issuing major civil rights decisions from his Charleston courtroom, including his 1951 dissent in Briggs v. Elliott declaring public school segregation per se unconstitutional. Three years later, the Supreme Court adopted Waring’s language and reasoning in Brown v. Board of Education. Richard Gergel’s Unexampled Courage details the impact of the blinding of Sergeant Woodard on the racial awakening of President Truman and Judge Waring, and traces their influential roles in changing the course of America’s civil rights history.

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  • File Pdf: the-yamasee-war.pdf

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  • File Pdf: einstein-s-shadow.pdf

Book Summary:

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Book Summary:

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Book Summary:

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  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
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  • Pages : 594
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  • File Pdf: hue-1968.pdf

Book Summary:

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Book Summary:

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Book Summary:

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  • File Pdf: the-anatomy-of-hope.pdf

Book Summary:

An inspiring and profoundly enlightening exploration of one doctor’s discovery of how hope can change the course of illness Since the time of the ancient Greeks, human beings have believed that hope is essential to life. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Harvard Medical School professor and New Yorker staff writer Jerome Groopman shows us why. The search for hope is most urgent at the patient’s bedside. The Anatomy of Hope takes us there, bringing us into the lives of people at pivotal moments when they reach for and find hope--or when it eludes their grasp. Through these intimate portraits, we learn how to distinguish true hope from false, why some people feel they are undeserving of it, and whether we should ever abandon our search. Can hope contribute to recovery by changing physical well-being? To answer this hotly debated question, Groopman embarked on an investigative journey to cutting-edge laboratories where researchers are unraveling an authentic biology of hope. There he finds a scientific basis for understanding the role of this vital emotion in the outcome of illness. Here is a book that offers a new way of thinking about hope, with a message for all readers, not only patients and their families. "We are just beginning to appreciate hope’s reach," Groopman writes, "and have not defined its limits. I see hope as the very heart of healing."

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Book Summary:

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  • Isbn : 0393081966
  • Pages : 384
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Book Summary:

“A highly informative, detailed, even thrilling account of how the Supreme Court arguments reshaped American law.”—Michael Bronkski, San Francisco Chronicle No one could have predicted that the night of September 17, 1998, would be anything but routine in Houston, Texas. Even the call to police that a black man was "going crazy with a gun" was hardly unusual in this urban setting. Nobody could have imagined that the arrest of two men for a minor criminal offense would reverberate in American constitutional law, exposing a deep malignity in our judicial system and challenging the traditional conception of what makes a family. Indeed, when Harris County sheriff’s deputies entered the second-floor apartment, there was no gun. Instead, they reported that they had walked in on John Lawrence and Tyron Garner having sex in Lawrence’s bedroom. So begins Dale Carpenter’s "gripping and brilliantly researched" Flagrant Conduct, a work nine years in the making that transforms our understanding of what we thought we knew about Lawrence v. Texas, the landmark Supreme Court decision of 2003 that invalidated America’s sodomy laws. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Carpenter has taken on the "gargantuan" task of extracting the truth about the case, analyzing the claims of virtually every person involved. Carpenter first introduces us to the interracial defendants themselves, who were hardly prepared "for the strike of lightning" that would upend their lives, and then to the Harris County arresting officers, including a sheriff’s deputy who claimed he had "looked eye to eye" in the faces of the men as they allegedly fornicated. Carpenter skillfully navigates Houston’s complex gay world of the late 1990s, where a group of activists and court officers, some of them closeted themselves, refused to bury what initially seemed to be a minor arrest. The author charts not only the careful legal strategy that Lambda Legal attorneys adopted to make the case compatible to a conservative Supreme Court but also the miscalculations of the Houston prosecutors who assumed that the nation’s extant sodomy laws would be upheld. Masterfully reenacting the arguments that riveted spectators and Justices alike in 2003, Flagrant Conduct then reaches a point where legal history becomes literature, animating a Supreme Court decision as few writers have done. In situating Lawrence v. Texas within the larger framework of America’s four-century persecution of gay men and lesbians, Flagrant Conduct compellingly demonstrates that gay history is an integral part of our national civil rights story.

Silence

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  • Isbn : 0544702514
  • Pages : 320
  • Category : History
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  • File Pdf: silence.pdf

Book Summary:

From the author of the “dazzling epic”* Brilliant, a compelling history of silence as a powerful shaper of the human mind—in prisons, in places of contemplation, and in our own lives Through her evocative intertwined histories of the penitentiary and the monastery, Jane Brox illuminates the many ways silence is far more complex than any absolute; how it has influenced ideas of the self, soul, and society. Brox traces its place as a transformative power in the monastic world from Medieval Europe to the very public life of twentieth century monk Thomas Merton, whose love for silence deepened even as he faced his obligation to speak out against war. This fascinating history of ideas also explores the influence the monastic cell had on one of society’s darkest experiments in silence: Eastern State Penitentiary. Conceived of by one of the Founding Fathers and built on the outskirts of Philadelphia, the penitentiary’s early promulgators imagined redemption in imposed isolation, but they badly misapprehended silence’s dangers. Finally, Brox’s rich exploration of silence’s complex and competing meanings leads us to imagine how we might navigate our own relationship with silence today, for the transformation it has always promised, in our own lives. *Time

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Book Summary:

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Four Hundred Souls

By Ibram X. Kendi,Keisha N. Blain
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Book Summary:

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A chorus of extraordinary voices tells the epic story of the four-hundred-year journey of African Americans from 1619 to the present—edited by Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to Be an Antiracist, and Keisha N. Blain, author of Set the World on Fire. FINALIST FOR THE ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post, Town & Country, Ms. magazine, BookPage, She Reads, BookRiot, Booklist • “A vital addition to [the] curriculum on race in America . . . a gateway to the solo works of all the voices in Kendi and Blain’s impressive choir.”—The Washington Post “From journalist Hannah P. Jones on Jamestown’s first slaves to historian Annette Gordon-Reed’s portrait of Sally Hemings to the seductive cadences of poets Jericho Brown and Patricia Smith, Four Hundred Souls weaves a tapestry of unspeakable suffering and unexpected transcendence.”—O: The Oprah Magazine The story begins in 1619—a year before the Mayflower—when the White Lion disgorges “some 20-and-odd Negroes” onto the shores of Virginia, inaugurating the African presence in what would become the United States. It takes us to the present, when African Americans, descendants of those on the White Lion and a thousand other routes to this country, continue a journey defined by inhuman oppression, visionary struggles, stunning achievements, and millions of ordinary lives passing through extraordinary history. Four Hundred Souls is a unique one-volume “community” history of African Americans. The editors, Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain, have assembled ninety brilliant writers, each of whom takes on a five-year period of that four-hundred-year span. The writers explore their periods through a variety of techniques: historical essays, short stories, personal vignettes, and fiery polemics. They approach history from various perspectives: through the eyes of towering historical icons or the untold stories of ordinary people; through places, laws, and objects. While themes of resistance and struggle, of hope and reinvention, course through the book, this collection of diverse pieces from ninety different minds, reflecting ninety different perspectives, fundamentally deconstructs the idea that Africans in America are a monolith—instead it unlocks the startling range of experiences and ideas that have always existed within the community of Blackness. This is a history that illuminates our past and gives us new ways of thinking about our future, written by the most vital and essential voices of our present.

Invisible

By Michele Lent Hirsch
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  • Publisher : Beacon Press
  • Isbn : 0807023965
  • Pages : 240
  • Category : Health & Fitness
  • Reads : 252
  • File Pdf: invisible.pdf

Book Summary:

Already appearing on must-read lists for Bitch, PopSugar, BookRiot, and Autostraddle, this is an exploration of women navigating serious health issues at an age where they're expected to be healthy, dating, having careers and children. Miriam’s doctor didn’t believe she had breast cancer. She did. Sophie navigates being the only black scientist in her lab while studying the very disease, HIV, that she hides from her coworkers. For Victoria, coming out as a transgender woman was less difficult than coming out as bipolar. Author Michele Lent Hirsch knew she couldn’t be the only woman who’s faced serious health issues at a young age, as well as the resulting effects on her career, her relationships, and her sense of self. What she found while researching Invisible was a surprisingly large and overlooked population with important stories to tell. Though young women with serious illness tend to be seen as outliers, young female patients are in fact the primary demographic for many illnesses. They are also one of the most ignored groups in our medical system—a system where young women, especially women of color and trans women, are invisible. And because of expectations about gender and age, young women with health issues must often deal with bias in their careers and personal lives. Not only do they feel pressured to seem perfect and youthful, they also find themselves amid labyrinthine obstacles in a culture that has one narrow idea of womanhood. Lent Hirsch weaves her own harrowing experiences together with stories from other women, perspectives from sociologists on structural inequality, and insights from neuroscientists on misogyny in health research. She shows how health issues and disabilities amplify what women in general already confront: warped beauty standards, workplace sexism, worries about romantic partners, and mistrust of their own bodies. By shining a light on this hidden demographic, Lent Hirsch explores the challenges that all women face.

Root and Branch

By Rawn James, Jr.
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
  • Isbn : 9781608191680
  • Pages : 288
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 831
  • File Pdf: root-and-branch.pdf

Book Summary:

Although widely viewed as the beginning of the legal struggle to end segregation, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision Brown v. Board of Education was in fact the culmination of decades of legal challenges led by a band of lawyers intent on dismantling segregation one statute at a time. Root and Branch is the compelling story of the fiercely committed lawyers that constructed the legal foundation for what we now call the civil rights movement. Charles Hamilton Houston laid the groundwork, reinventing the law school at Howard University (where he taught a young, brash Thurgood Marshall) and becoming special counsel to the NAACP. Later Houston and Marshall traveled through the hostile South, looking for cases with which to dismantle America's long-systematized racism, often at great personal risk. The abstemious, buttoned-down Houston and the folksy, easygoing Marshall made an unlikely pair-but their accomplishments in bringing down Jim Crow made an unforgettable impact on U.S. legal history.

Don't Label Me

By Irshad Manji
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  • Publisher : St. Martin's Press
  • Isbn : 1250182867
  • Pages : 272
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 976
  • File Pdf: don-t-label-me.pdf

Book Summary:

"Don't Label Me should be labeled as genius. It's an amazing book." - Chris Rock A unique conversation about diversity, bigotry, and our common humanity, by the New York Times bestselling author, Oprah “Chutzpah” award-winner, and founder of the Moral Courage Project In these United States, discord has hit emergency levels. Civility isn't the reason to repair our caustic chasms. Diversity is. Don't Label Me shows that America's founding genius is diversity of thought. Which is why social justice activists won't win by labeling those who disagree with them. At a time when minorities are fast becoming the majority, a truly new America requires a new way to tribe out. Enter Irshad Manji and her dog, Lily. Raised to believe that dogs are evil, Manji overcame her fear of the "other" to adopt Lily. She got more than she bargained for. Defying her labels as an old, blind dog, Lily engages Manji in a taboo-busting conversation about identity, power, and politics. They're feisty. They're funny. And in working through their challenges to one another, they reveal how to open the hearts of opponents for the sake of enduring progress. Readers who crave concrete tips will be delighted. Studded with insights from epigenetics and epistemology, layered with the lessons of Bruce Lee, Ben Franklin, and Audre Lorde, punctuated with stories about Manji's own experiences as a refugee from Africa, a Muslim immigrant to the U.S., and a professor of moral courage, Don't Label Me makes diversity great again.

Stolen Dreams

By Chris Lamb
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
  • Isbn : 1496231112
  • Pages :
  • Category :
  • Reads : 270
  • File Pdf: stolen-dreams.pdf

Book Summary:

Features a collection of photographs of child laborers, taken by David Parker and sponsored by the Harvard Education and Research Center and the Occupational Health Program of the Department of Environmental Health.

Dare to Speak

By Suzanne Nossel
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Isbn : 0062966065
  • Pages : 320
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 953
  • File Pdf: dare-to-speak.pdf

Book Summary:

"A must read."—Margaret Atwood A vital, necessary playbook for navigating and defending free speech today by the CEO of PEN America, Dare To Speak provides a pathway for promoting free expression while also cultivating a more inclusive public culture. Online trolls and fascist chat groups. Controversies over campus lectures. Cancel culture versus censorship. The daily hazards and debates surrounding free speech dominate headlines and fuel social media storms. In an era where one tweet can launch—or end—your career, and where free speech is often invoked as a principle but rarely understood, learning to maneuver the fast-changing, treacherous landscape of public discourse has never been more urgent. In Dare To Speak, Suzanne Nossel, a leading voice in support of free expression, delivers a vital, necessary guide to maintaining democratic debate that is open, free-wheeling but at the same time respectful of the rich diversity of backgrounds and opinions in a changing country. Centered on practical principles, Nossel’s primer equips readers with the tools needed to speak one’s mind in today’s diverse, digitized, and highly-divided society without resorting to curbs on free expression. At a time when free speech is often pitted against other progressive axioms—namely diversity and equality—Dare To Speak presents a clear-eyed argument that the drive to create a more inclusive society need not, and must not, compromise robust protections for free speech. Nossel provides concrete guidance on how to reconcile these two sets of core values within universities, on social media, and in daily life. She advises readers how to: Use language conscientiously without self-censoring ideas; Defend the right to express unpopular views; And protest without silencing speech. Nossel warns against the increasingly fashionable embrace of expanded government and corporate controls over speech, warning that such strictures can reinforce the marginalization of lesser-heard voices. She argues that creating an open market of ideas demands aggressive steps to remedy exclusion and ensure equal participation. Replete with insightful arguments, colorful examples, and salient advice, Dare To Speak brings much-needed clarity and guidance to this pressing—and often misunderstood—debate.

Our Man in Charleston

By Christopher Dickey
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Crown
  • Isbn : 0307887294
  • Pages : 400
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 279
  • File Pdf: our-man-in-charleston.pdf

Book Summary:

Between the Confederacy and recognition by Great Britain stood one unlikely Englishman who hated the slave trade. His actions helped determine the fate of a nation. When Robert Bunch arrived in Charleston to take up the post of British consul in 1853, he was young and full of ambition, but even he couldn’t have imagined the incredible role he would play in the history-making events to unfold. In an age when diplomats often were spies, Bunch’s job included sending intelligence back to the British government in London. Yet as the United States threatened to erupt into Civil War, Bunch found himself plunged into a double life, settling into an amiable routine with his slavery-loving neighbors on the one hand, while working furiously to thwart their plans to achieve a new Confederacy. As secession and war approached, the Southern states found themselves in an impossible position. They knew that recognition from Great Britain would be essential to the survival of the Confederacy, and also that such recognition was likely to be withheld if the South reopened the Atlantic slave trade. But as Bunch meticulously noted from his perch in Charleston, secession’s red-hot epicenter, that trade was growing. And as Southern leaders continued to dissemble publicly about their intentions, Bunch sent dispatch after secret dispatch back to the Foreign Office warning of the truth—that economic survival would force the South to import slaves from Africa in massive numbers. When the gears of war finally began to turn, and Bunch was pressed into service on an actual spy mission to make contact with the Confederate government, he found himself in the middle of a fight between the Union and Britain that threatened, in the boast of Secretary of State William Seward, to “wrap the world in flames.” In this masterfully told story, Christopher Dickey introduces Consul Bunch as a key figure in the pitched battle between those who wished to reopen the floodgates of bondage and misery, and those who wished to dam the tide forever. Featuring a remarkable cast of diplomats, journalists, senators, and spies, Our Man in Charleston captures the intricate, intense relationship between great powers on the brink of war.

The Bezos Blueprint

By Carmine Gallo
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : St. Martin's Press
  • Isbn : 1250278341
  • Pages : 272
  • Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Reads : 330
  • File Pdf: the-bezos-blueprint.pdf

Book Summary:

Read and download full book The Bezos Blueprint

Black Bodies Swinging

By Robin D. G. Kelley
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Metropolitan Books
  • Isbn : 125080308X
  • Pages : 224
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 382
  • File Pdf: black-bodies-swinging.pdf

Book Summary:

From Robin D. G. Kelley, a "leading black historian of the age," Black Bodies Swinging is a fierce, distilled history of the pillage and defiance of Black America...

Don Quixote

By Miguel de Cervantes
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Graphic Arts Books
  • Isbn : 1513265628
  • Pages : 964
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 973
  • File Pdf: don-quixote.pdf

Book Summary:

“Don Quixote looms so wonderfully above the skylines of literature, a gaunt giant on a lean nag, that the book lives and will live through his sheer vitality...The parody has become a paragon.”-Vladimir Nabokov “A more profound and powerful work than this is not to be met with...The final and greatest utterance of the human mind.”- Fyodor Dostoyevsky Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote is regarded not only as the first modern novel, but also as one of the most important works of fiction ever produced. The subtle and hopeful irony, resplendent variety of characters and its thoroughly entertaining sense of adventure and friendship has dazzled readers for more than four hundred years. It was published in Spain in two volumes, first in 1605 then followed by the second in 1615. Cervantes’ use of realism and everyday language in Don Quixote was revolutionary at the time, and its influence on the development of literature may only be surpassed by the work of Shakespeare. In the opening of this extraordinary book, Alonso Quijano, a noble living in sixteenth-century Spain, has become consumed with the act of reading, and subsequently assumes the identity of the chivalrous knights that he loves to read about. Transformed into Don Quixote, he embarks on his first ill-fated journey as a “knight”. The defeated Quixote returns home, to only prepare himself better for the next adventure of delusion. On his second journey Quixote has enlisted the peasant Sancho Panza to appropriate the role of his squire. Although the duo is ridiculously mismatched in every sense, their inextricable bond is one of the most fascinating of friendships ever created on paper. Between their disordered adventures -of battling windmills and herds of sheep and endless mishaps- are the stories of those who are encountered on the journey. The book eventually becomes a hall of mirrors, and Cervantes explores preconceptions of narrative, reliability, and morality that are strikingly modern. Ultimately, Quixote’s preposterous fantasies become haunting as the reader of this book will surely begin to question what is real and what is not. The story of Don Quixote has been adapted into numerous forms, including opera, musicals, ballets, music and film. With an eye-catching new cover, and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Don Quixote is both modern and readable.

Justice Deferred

By Orville Vernon Burton,Armand Derfner
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Isbn : 067425886X
  • Pages : 432
  • Category : Law
  • Reads : 367
  • File Pdf: justice-deferred.pdf

Book Summary:

In the first comprehensive accounting of the U.S. Supreme Court’s race-related jurisprudence, a distinguished historian and renowned civil rights lawyer scrutinize a legacy too often blighted by racial injustice. The Supreme Court is usually seen as protector of our liberties: it ended segregation, was a guarantor of fair trials, and safeguarded free speech and the vote. But this narrative derives mostly from a short period, from the 1930s to the early 1970s. Before then, the Court spent a century largely ignoring or suppressing basic rights, while the fifty years since 1970 have witnessed a mostly accelerating retreat from racial justice. From the Cherokee Trail of Tears to Brown v. Board of Education to the dismantling of the Voting Rights Act, historian Orville Vernon Burton and civil rights lawyer Armand Derfner shine a powerful light on the Court’s race record—a legacy at times uplifting, but more often distressing and sometimes disgraceful. For nearly a century, the Court ensured that the nineteenth-century Reconstruction amendments would not truly free and enfranchise African Americans. And the twenty-first century has seen a steady erosion of commitments to enforcing hard-won rights. Justice Deferred is the first book that comprehensively charts the Court’s race jurisprudence. Addressing nearly two hundred cases involving America’s racial minorities, the authors probe the parties involved, the justices’ reasoning, and the impact of individual rulings. We learn of heroes such as Thurgood Marshall; villains, including Roger Taney; and enigmas like Oliver Wendell Holmes and Hugo Black. Much of the fragility of civil rights in America is due to the Supreme Court, but as this sweeping history also reminds us, the justices still have the power to make good on the country’s promise of equal rights for all.

The Fifties

By James R. Gaines
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Isbn : 1439109915
  • Pages : 288
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 427
  • File Pdf: the-fifties.pdf

Book Summary:

A bold and original argument that upends the myth of the Fifties as a decade of conformity to celebrate the solitary, brave, and stubborn individuals who pioneered the radical gay rights, feminist, civil rights, and environmental movements, from historian James R. Gaines. In a fascinating and beautifully written series of character portraits, The Fifties invokes the accidental radicals—people motivated not by politics but by their own most intimate conflicts—who sparked movements for change in their time and our own. Among many others, we meet the legal pathfinder Pauli Murray, who was tortured by both her mixed-race heritage and her “in between” sexuality. Through years of hard work and self-examination, she turned her demons into historic victories. Ruth Bader Ginsberg credited her for the argument that made sex discrimination illegal, but that was only one of her gifts to 21st-century feminism. We meet Harry Hay, who dreamed of a national gay-rights movement as early as the mid-1940s, a time when the US, Soviet Union, and Nazi Germany viewed gay people as subversives and mentally ill. And in perhaps the book’s unlikeliest pairing, we hear the prophetic voices of Silent Spring’s Rachel Carson and MIT’s preeminent mathematician, Norbert Wiener, who from their very different perspectives—she in the living world, he in the theoretical one—converged on the then-heretical idea that our mastery over the natural world carried the potential for disaster. Their legacy is the environmental movement. The Fifties is a dazzling and provocative work of history that transforms our understanding of a seemingly staid decade and honors the pioneers of gay rights, feminism, civil rights, and environmentalism. The book carries the powerful message that change actually begins not in mass movements and new legislation but in the lives of de-centered, often lonely individuals, who learn to fight for change in a daily struggle with themselves.

The Slow Undoing

By Stephen H. Lowe
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ of South Carolina Press
  • Isbn : 1643361775
  • Pages : 256
  • Category : Law
  • Reads : 958
  • File Pdf: the-slow-undoing.pdf

Book Summary:

A study of how South Carolina's federal district courts were central to achieving and solidifying gains during the civil rights moment As the first comprehensive study of one state's federal district courts during the long civil rights movement, The Slow Undoing argues for a reconsideration of the role of the federal courts in the civil rights movement. It places the courts as a central battleground at the intersections of struggles over race, law, and civil rights. During the long civil rights movement, Black and White South Carolinians used the courts as a venue to contest the meanings of the constitution, justice, equality, and citizenship. African American plaintiffs and lawyers from South Carolina, with the support of Thurgood Marshall and other lawyers from the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, brought and argued civil rights lawsuits in South Carolina's federal courts attempting to secure the vote, raise teacher salaries, and to equalize and then desegregate schools, parks, and public life. In response, white citizens, state politicians, and local officials, hired their own lawyers who countered these arguments by crafting new legal theories in an attempt to defend state practices and thwart African American aspirations of equality and to preserve white supremacy. The Slow Undoing argues for a reconsideration of the role of federal courts in the civil rights movement by demonstrating that both before and after Brown v. Board of Education, the federal district courts were centrally important to achieving and solidifying civil rights gains. It relies on the entire legal record of actions in the federal district courts of South Carolina from 1940 to 1970 to make the case. It argues that rather than relying on litigation during the pre-Brown era and direct action in the post-Brown era, African Americans instead used courts and direct action in tandem to bring down legal segregation throughout the long civil rights era. But the process was far from linear and the courts were not always a progressive force. The battles were long, the victories won were often imperfect, and many of the fights remain. Author Stephen H. Lowe offers a chronicle of this enduring struggle.

THE WARS IN WILDERNESS - Action & Adventure Collection

By R. M. Ballantyne
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : e-artnow
  • Isbn : N.a
  • Pages : 1610
  • Category : Young Adult Fiction
  • Reads : 536
  • File Pdf: the-wars-in-wilderness-action-adventure-collection.pdf

Book Summary:

The vast wilderness of Africa has inspired R. M. Ballantyne to set plots of several of his novels on the Black Continent; from safari tales and wild animal hunting to political thrillers and stories of tyrant monarch. Table of Contents: The Gorilla Hunters: A Tale of the Wilds of Africa Hunting the Lions Black Ivory: A Tale of Adventures among the Slavers of East Africa The Settler and the Savage: A Tale of Peace and War in South Africa The Fugitives: The Tyrant Queen of Madagascar Blue Lights: Hot Work in the Soudan The Middy and the Moors: An Algerine Story Six Months at the Cape

The Complete Novels: Western Classics, Sea Adventures, Action Thrillers & Historical Novels

By R. M. Ballantyne
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : e-artnow
  • Isbn : N.a
  • Pages : 14649
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 330
  • File Pdf: the-complete-novels.pdf

Book Summary:

This eBook edition of "The Complete Novels: Western Classics, Sea Adventures, Action Thrillers & Historical Novels" has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Table of contents: The Coral Island Snowflakes and Sunbeams (The Young Fur Traders) Ungava Martin Rattler The Dog Crusoe and his Master The World of Ice The Gorilla Hunters The Golden Dream The Red Eric Away in the Wilderness Fighting the Whales The Wild Man of the West Fast in the Ice Gascoyne The Lifeboat Chasing the Sun Freaks on the Fells The Lighthouse Fighting The Flames Silver Lake Deep Down Shifting Winds Hunting the Lions Over the Rocky Mountains Saved by the Lifeboat Erling the Bold The Battle and the Breeze The Cannibal Islands Lost in the Forest Digging for Gold Sunk at Sea The Floating Light of the Goodwin Sands The Iron Horse The Norsemen in the West The Pioneers Black Ivory Life in the Red Brigade Fort Desolation The Pirate City The Story of the Rock Rivers of Ice Under the Waves The Settler and the Savage In the Track of the Troops Jarwin and Cuffy Philosopher Jack Post Haste The Lonely Island The Red Man's Revenge My Doggie and I The Giant of the North The Madman and the Pirate The Battery and the Boiler The Thorogood Family The Young Trawler Dusty Diamonds, Cut and Polished Twice Bought The Island Queen The Rover of the Andes The Prairie Chief The Lively Poll Red Rooney The Big Otter The Fugitives Blue Lights The Middy and the Moors The Eagle Cliff The Crew of the Water Wagtail Blown to Bits The Garret and the Garden Jeff Benson Charlie to the Rescue The Coxswain's Bride The Buffalo Runners The Hot Swamp Hunted and Harried The Walrus Hunters Wrecked but not Ruined Six Months at the Cape Memoirs: Personal Reminiscences in Book Making

Biblical Illustrator, Volume 5

By Exell, Joseph S.
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Delmarva Publications, Inc.
  • Isbn : N.a
  • Pages :
  • Category :
  • Reads : 329
  • File Pdf: biblical-illustrator-volume-5.pdf

Book Summary:

Would you like it if one of the greatest preachers could help you prepare your sermons? How about 20+ ministers to assist you with your sermon? Joseph Exell included content from some of the most famous preachers such as Dwight L. Moody, Charles Spurgeon, J. C. Ryle, Charles Hodge, Alexander MacLaren, Adam Clark, Matthew Henry and many more. He compiled this 56 volume Biblical Illustrator Commentary and Delmarva Publications, Inc. is publishing it in a 6 volume digital set with a linked table of contents for ease of studying. This set includes the analysis on entire Bible, Old and New Testament. Complete your resources with this Biblical Illustrator by Joseph Exell.

Violette

By Tania Szabó
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : The History Press
  • Isbn : 0750964723
  • Pages : 384
  • Category : Biography & Autobiography
  • Reads : 665
  • File Pdf: violette.pdf

Book Summary:

SOE agent Violette Szabó was one of the most incredible women who operated behind enemy lines during the Second World War. The daughter of an English father and French mother, and widow of a French army officer, she was daring and courageous, conducting sabotage missions, being embroiled in gun battles and battling betrayal. On her second mission she was captured by the Nazis, interrogated and tortured, then deported to Germany where she was eventually executed at Ravensbrück concentration camp. Violette was one of the first women ever to be awarded the George Cross, and her fascinating life has been immortalised in film and on the page. Written by her daughter, Violette (formerly Young, Brave and Beautiful) reveals the woman and mother behind this extraordinary hero.

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